the chocolate peanut butter gallery

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Homemade (And Not-So-Awkward) Monkey Doughnuts

September 23rd, 2010

Banana Doughnuts

Don’t get the title? Check out my previous post.

I was flipping through a recent issue of Everyday with Rachael Ray and came across a recipe for Banana Doughnuts. With a pile of ripe bananas in my kitchen and that Monkey-See Monkey-Donut still fresh in my mind, I knew what I had to do.

Doughnuts are one of the seemingly few types of desserts that I’ve never made before, so this seemed like a great recipe to make to cross them off the list. I don’t own a doughnut pan so I baked these in my twinkie pan – which you may remember from Devil’s Food Twinkies with Peanut Butter Filling. Oh, why did I have to click that link- now I want a twinkie! *Sigh* I live a tough life.

These turned out to be kind of a mix between a doughnut and a muffin. I remember thinking the same thing about Doughnut Plant’s Banana Doughnut as well though so maybe that’s just how it goes? This wasn’t an issue for me though, since they were very good. My only real qualm with the recipe is that the banana frosting didn’t set into a hard coating like most doughnut frostings do. It was great and they tasted wonderful- that just wasn’t what I was expecting. Maybe adding a little extra powdered sugar would have done the trick? I was also planning on sharing them with a friend, but with the messy icing, couldn’t really pack them up and transport them without expecting a hot mess later on. So no doughnuts for my friend. Sadness.

Banana Doughnuts

The banana frosting sounded good and all, but wanting to mix it up (and be a little extra naughty… hee!), I decided to fill some of the doughnuts with marshmallow fluff and others with chocolate peanut butter ganache. Feeling too lazy to pipe the filling, I just cut a slit down the middles of them and added the filling using a pastry spreader. I covered the slit with the banana frosting and topped it all off with chocolate sprinkles (aka jimmies) so that they looked even more like doughnuts. They were so cute! And check out that filling.

Banana Doughnuts

Whoa mama.

Here are some different ideas for customizing these bad boys:
- Make them as is (banana doughnut topped with banana frosting)
- Fill with marshmallow fluff and top with banana frosting & chocolate sprinkles
- Fill with chocolate peanut butter ganache (recipe below) and top with banana frosting & chocolate sprinkles
- Fill with marshmallow fluff and top with chocolate peanut butter ganache
- Don’t frost them with anything and eat them warm. Maybe dip them into your morning coffee or chocolate peanut butter hot chocolate. Mmm!

Note: If you opt to fill them with marshmallow fluff, fill and let them sit for 10 minutes so the fluff can settle. If you don’t, your frosting will sink in the middle once it settles. Also, sometimes the fluff evaporates a little after a couple days so I’d recommend eating them within a day or two. I think you’re up to the task!

Recipe after the break. Enjoy!

Get the recipe for Banana Doughnuts at Everyday with Rachael Ray. If using a twinkie pan, bake them for 18 minutes. If using a mini bundt pan, bake them for 20.

Chocolate Peanut Butter Ganache
modified from this recipe

Ingredients
1/4 cup heavy cream
2 1/2 Tbsp smooth peanut butter
6 oz chocolate, chopped and melted (I used a mix of milk and semi-sweet)
1 1/2 tsp light corn syrup
1/2 tsp vanilla extract

Directions
Bring the heavy cream to a simmer with the peanut butter, stirring until homogenous but not over-heated. Stir this into the melted chocolate. Then add the corn syrup and vanilla and whisk to combine. Store any leftover glaze in the refrigerator for up to 1 week and, once very chilled, make truffles! Just scoop it into large acorn-size pieces and, after rolling them into balls, roll them in the powdered sugar toppings, as listed (either the one flavored with cinnamon or cocoa). Store the truffles in the refrigerator.

2 responses so far:

  • In my experience, frosting with fat (such as shortening, which the Rachel Ray frosting has, or butter) doesn’t solidify like you want ‘glaze’ to–because fat doesn’t get hard or evaporate if left at room temperature. What makes cookie glaze and such usually hard is just having milk & powdered sugar (or juice & powdered sugar, or liquid & powdered sugar) for glaze that will harden on sugar cookies.

    by AlexisSep 24, 2010 at 9:37 pm
  • thanks for dropping by my blog, Kristina. The doughnuts look so good.

    I also saw some of your work on http://www.kristinasacci.com/ and they are great.

    by dassanaSep 30, 2010 at 8:21 am

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